Tw-inspiration! Lots of Tweet Ideas for Writers

Tw-inspiration! Lots of Tweet Ideas for Writers provides writers with links to posts full of ideas and inspiration about what to tweet about on Twitter.

A while ago I wrote a roundup post called Hundreds of Blog Post Ideas for Writers. It’s been a fairly popular post here on Bound and Determined and I have to confess that on days when my brain is drained and I need to write a blog post, I sometimes open up the post and click on a few of those links for inspiration!

In that same vein, today I thought I’d roundup a few blog posts about what you can tweet about.

So, in no particular order, here’s a list of posts filled with lots of ideas, and inspiration, to get you tweeting away like a pro. Please note that many of these ideas are generic and not specific to writers, but can generally be geared toward a writer’s followers with a little ingenuity!

Continue reading “Tw-inspiration! Lots of Tweet Ideas for Writers”

Twitter: Jazz It Up With Special Characters

Twitter: Jazz It Up With Special Characters – If you have noticed Twitter profiles and tweets containing images or special characters and wanted to use them, too, read this article.

Have you ever noticed on Twitter how some profiles and tweets contain images or special characters? Have you ever wanted to use them, too, and wondered how to do it?

If you’re nodding your head and answering “Yes” to the above questions, you’ll be happy to know that you can find the answers right here!

Special Characters for Twitter

Check out these articles for more information:

And, this Chrome browser extension might be helpful for jazzing up things on Twitter, too:

If you decide to add special characters to your profile or tweets on Twitter, let me know in the comments below or follow me on Twitter: @ShelleySturgeon.

5 Twitter Hashtags to Connect With Writers and Market Your Book

5 Twitter Hashtags to Connect With Writers and Market Your Book suggests several popular hashtags used by writers to connect with other writers and to market their books.

I must confess that I rarely use hashtags on Twitter but I know that I should.

Think of a hashtag as a subdirectory on Twitter or a file folder in an old fashioned filing cabinet. When a hashtag is added to a tweet, it can be accessed along with all other tweets with that hashtag very simply by searching for that hashtag.

To see tweets with these hashtags, log into your Twitter account and then click the links below.

  1. #amwriting – You can also try #writing, #writelife, #WritingTip or #WriteTip
  2. #author – You can also try #AuthorLife, or #Authors
  3. #selfpub – You can also try #selfpublishing, #indie, #indieauthor, #indieauthors or #indiepub
  4. #bookmarketing – You could also try #bookbuzzr
  5. #novelist – You could also try #fiction, #nonfiction or #poetry

More Examples of Hashtags for Writers

100 Twitter Hashtags Every Writer Should Know

205 Author Hashtags

Hashtags for #writing in Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr

102 Hashtags Smart Writers Are Using to Build BIG Brands on Twitter

Twitter Hashtags for Authors and Book Marketing Pros

44 Essential Twitter Hashtags Every Author Should Know

Do you have a favourite hashtag for writers? If so, tell me in the comments.

Photo credit: Pixabay

25 Top Authors on Twitter to Follow and Learn From

25 Top Authors on Twitter to Follow and Learn From offers a list of 25 popular authors found on Twitter to give new authors examples and ideas of what to tweet about.

Twitter is a great place for authors to connect with fellow authors, readers and reviewers and because of this authors are often advised to connect with people on Twitter as part of building their author platform.

But to authors new to social media, or new to Twitter, this can be a bit intimidating. It’s hard to imagine how you can communicate and connect with people a 140 characters at a time, right?

So today, I thought I’d show you some examples of famous authors who are successfully using Twitter.

Authors to Follow on Twitter

In no particular order here are 25 popular authors on Twitter:

  1. Author: Teju Cole
    @tejucole
    Followers: 179K
    Following: 981
    # of Tweets: 13.3K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,035
    Joined: October 2009
  2. Author: Joyce Carol Oates
    @JoyceCarolOates
    Followers: 116K
    Following: 72
    # of Tweets: 11K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 157
    Joined: September 2012
  3. Author: Paulo Coelho
    @paulocoelho
    Followers: 9.87M
    Following: 198
    # of Tweets: 29.1K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 3,737
    Joined: April 2007
  4. Author: Salman Rushdie
    @SalmanRushdie
    Followers: 934K
    Following: 503
    # of Tweets: 2,927
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 51
    Joined: September 2011
  5. Author: Jackie Collins
    @jackiejcollins
    Followers: 140K
    Following: 381
    # of Tweets: 20.9
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 410
    Joined: April 2009
  6. Author: Sloane Crosley
    @askanyone
    Followers: 81.1K
    Following: 183
    # of Tweets: 3,210
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 149
    Joined: March 2009
  7. Author: Alain de Botton
    @alaindebotton
    Followers: 494K
    Following: 557
    # of Tweets: 1,311
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 215
    Joined: February 2009
  8. Author: Anthony Bourdain
    @Bourdain
    Followers: 2.02M
    Following: 557
    # of Tweets: 11.2K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,018
    Joined: April 2008
  9. Author: Margaret E. Atwood
    @MargaretAtwood
    Followers: 653K
    Following: 1,051
    # of Tweets: 25.6K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 349
    Joined: July 2009
  10. Author: Ian Rankin
    @Beathhigh
    Followers: 83.8K
    Following: 1,149
    # of Tweets: 45.2K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 900
    Joined: May 2009
  11. Author: Neil Gaiman
    @neilhimself
    Followers: 2.17M
    Following: 821
    # of Tweets: 80.1K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,518
    Joined: December 2008
  12. Author: Nicholas Sparks
    @NicholasSparks
    Followers: 456K
    Following: 200
    # of Tweets: 6,903
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 335
    Joined: February 2010
  13. Author: Bryan Lee O’Malley
    @radiomaru
    Followers: 95.8K
    Following: 299
    # of Tweets: 41.3K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,273
    Joined: June 2008
  14. Author: Chuck Palahniuk
    @chuckpalahniuk
    Followers: 526K
    Following: 112
    # of Tweets: 5,879
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 355
    Joined: January 2009
  15. Author: E L James
    @E_L_James
    Followers: 735K
    Following: 436
    # of Tweets: 38.4K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,087
    Joined: January 2011
  16. Author: Jennifer Weiner
    @jenniferweiner
    Followers: 107K
    Following: 1,803
    # of Tweets: 21.8K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 330
    Joined: April 2009
  17. Author: R.L. Stine
    @RL_Stine
    Followers: 147K
    Following: 95
    # of Tweets: 19.7K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 253
    Joined: December 2009
  18. Author: Meg Cabot
    @megcabot
    Followers: 234K
    Following: 29.2K
    # of Tweets: 4,290
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 391
    Joined: December 2008
  19. Author: sarahdessen
    @sarahdessen
    Followers: 253K
    Following: 295
    # of Tweets: 43.1K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 1,473
    Joined: July 2008
  20. Author: Maureen Johnson
    @maureenjohnson
    Followers: 112K
    Following: 762
    # of Tweets: 83.9
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 2,572
    Joined: June 2008
  21. Author: Eve Mayer
    @LinkedInQueen
    Followers: 95.3K
    Following: 94.1K
    # of Tweets: 31.5K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 436
    Joined: May 2009
  22. Author: James Patterson
    @JP_Books
    Followers: 69.1K
    Following: 2,761
    # of Tweets: 2,415
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 103
    Joined: August 2010
  23. Author: Jodi Picoult
    @jodipicoult
    Followers: 103K
    Following: 193
    # of Tweets: 10.2K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 148
    Joined: April 2009
  24. Author: Anne Rice
    @AnneRiceAuthor
    Followers: 93.7K
    Following: 100
    # of Tweets: 13.6K
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 247
    Joined: March 2009
  25. Author: Rick Riordan
    @camphalfblood
    Followers: 359K
    Following: 15
    # of Tweets: 5,869
    # of Photos or Videos Shared: 421
    Joined: January 2009

So? What Can We Learn?

Some of these authors will be familiar to you for their books and a few of these names will be familiar because they’ve made the news for other connections or reasons.

I encourage you to explore these accounts on Twitter. See what they’re tweeting about and how often they’re tweeting. How often are they interacting with others? How often are they promoting other people and not just themselves? What are the photos and videos they’re sharing? Who are they following?

Note how many of the authors use their own names as their Twitter account names. This is an example of branding.

Let me know if you reach any conclusions, or have any questions, in the comments.

Photo credit: Pixabay

Twitter: Secrets to Successfully Maintaining an Account

Twitter: Secrets to Successfully Maintaining an Account offers instructions for setting up an account, following, unfollowing, and tweeting content.

The prospect of successfully maintaining a Twitter account can be overwhelming when you think of all it entails:

  • Setting up the account.
  • Following others on Twitter.
  • Reciprocating and following your new followers back.
  • Deciding what to tweet about.
  • Scheduling tweets and/or tweeting live.
  • Unfollowing people who aren’t following you back or who are no longer active on Twitter.

But, if you break this down task-by-task, it’s not that difficult and can be done with minimal effort.

Setting up the account

Following the instructions in these articles should help you set up your account.

Following others on Twitter

If you’re an author, you’ll probably be interested in following other authors, book reviewers, and readers of books in your genre. The absolute easiest way to do this is find someone who is active and successful on Twitter who parallels you and/or your book. By this I mean if they’ve written a crime mystery book, and you have too, see who they are following. Odds are good they are focusing on following authors, book reviewers, and readers of books in your genre. It won’t always be the case, but if you can find someone like this, your job is much easier.

If you can find someone like this, just go through the profile descriptions for the people they’re following and search for the keywords like author, writer, reviewer, reviews, reading, etc. It might take you a while to scan through the profiles at first but with time and practice you’ll soon be flying through the profiles and finding people to follow.

If you’re looking for an account to do this with, try mine if you’d like. Log in to your own account, then alter the URL in your browser (or click on this link) so that it reads: https://twitter.com/ShelleySturgeon/following. This is just redirecting you to my profile page the same way as you would if you searched for it through Twitter’s search option and selected my account. There’s no black magic, or blue or pink or any other colour of magic involved in just altering the URL if you know where you’re going and I’m just giving you my account for the sake of example.

The accounts that are being followed will be displayed in three columns. Speed read through the profile descriptions and click on the Follow button for the ones that appeal to you. The accounts you are already following will display a blue button labeled Following. If you request to follow a secured account (displaying the padlock) a message is sent to the account holder and they must grant you permission before you can follow the account. Easy peasy.

Reciprocating and following your new followers back

Frances Caballo introduced me to Nutshell Mail and it’s a great tool to use to help you keep track of your new followers.

Sign up for a free account and specify your preferences of when you’d like your email sent to you. It sends out an email at that time(s) with a list of your new Twitter followers.

When I get my emails from Nutshell Mail, I make sure I’m already logged into my Twitter account and then very quickly right mouse click on the new followers in the email to open their Twitter pages in a new browser tab and when they’re all opened, I go from tab to tab as follows:

  • If the blue Following button is displayed, I’ve already made the decision to follow this account and they’re just following me back. End of story. I close that browser tab.
  • If the white Follow button is displayed, this is a brand spanking new follower. I quickly read over the profile. If it’s someone I’d like to follow, I click on the Follow button. End of that story and I close that browser tab.
  • If the white Follow button is displayed, this too is a brand spanking new follower. But if after reading over the profile, I decide it is someone I don’t want to follow, I just close the browser tab.

You can also see who has mentioned you or direct messaged you on Twitter in your Nutshell email and can respond through their interface instead of through Twitter if you want to.

Deciding what to tweet about

Do share content of value and not just your own content. It’s believed that the ratio of quality content you share should be 80% other people’s content/20% your own content.

And, please, don’t drone on and on and on about “Buy my book!” “Buy my book!” or even “Come on! You KNOW you want to buy MY book!” Nobody wants to follow someone who does that. We record all the television we watch at our house and fast forward through the commercials. When you offer nothing more than repeated attempts to sell your book on Twitter, that’s not much better than a steady stream of commercials. There’s no fast forward on Twitter. They’ll just stop following you. (And, hate to break it to you, but it’s also highly unlikely they’re going to buy your book!)

Watch other authors to see what they tweet about. This article might help:

Scheduling tweets and/or tweeting live.

You do realize, don’t you, that people who tweet at 2 a.m. aren’t necessarily setting their alarms and running to their computers to send out a tweet? You can schedule tweets and most of us do. (If you didn’t realize this, I imagine you’re feeling extremely relieved right now!)

I tend to schedule a lot of my content and live tweet comments about my day or articles as I read them online if they’ve just been published or when I’m interacting with others.

I use a free account at Socialoomph, but there’s also Hootsuite and a couple of other sites which allow you to set up content to be tweeted.

I like to tweet blog posts from other bloggers mostly to do with writing or self-publishing so my standard wording for scheduled tweets is:

(Blog Post Title) + (shortened URL) + via @(Twitter account of the article’s author or hosting blog)

Opinions vary on how often you should tweet and what times you should tweet but to start with, do what you are comfortable with and have time to do. Adjust it as required when you’ve had a chance to analyse the response you’re getting, etc.

Unfollowing people who aren’t following you back or who are no longer active on Twitter.

Again I need to thank Frances Caballo for telling me about this site, Manage Flitter.

  1. Log into Manage Flitter with your Twitter account and let it get your account details.
  2. You can then select to view those accounts which are:
    • Not Following Back
    • No Profile Image
    • Non-English
    • Inactive
    • Fake (SPAM)
    • Talkative/Quiet
    • High Influence/Low Influence

    There are a few more options available and some of the options are only for paid Manage Flitter accounts.

  3. Select the Not Following Back in the list which will appear on your left. As you slide your cursor over the Unfollow button, on the right you’ll see a box of information about that Twitter account including their profile, their location, how many times a day that person tweets, how old the account is, the number of followers, the number they’re following, and more.
     
    You can then decide if you want to continue to follow this person which will allow you to view their tweets even though they won’t see yours because they aren’t following you.

    If you wish to unfollow the account, click on the Unfollow button. The next account in the list will then scroll up to the same position and you can do it all over again.

    If you really don’t care to know the details and all that really matters to you is that they aren’t following you back, it’s quite acceptable to just repeatedly click on the Unfollow button until you’ve purged all of the accounts that aren’t reciprocating by following you back.

So there you have it!

That pretty much covers the basics with a few tricks of the trade thrown in for good measure.

Good luck and let me know in the comments if you’ve got specific questions. I’ll be happy to help.

Photo credit: Pixabay

Twitter Profile Page Updates

Twitter Profile Page Updates details recent Twitter changes affecting updates to users’ profile page settings.

I love social media, and I hate it. There I said it! I hate it when changes are made to something that I figured out, especially when there doesn’t seem to be a reason or need behind that change, but it appears to be change just for the sake of change.

Such is the case with Twitter at the moment, but they (Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, etc.) all do it. Like death and taxes, I guess this is just a reality.

A few weeks ago, I wrote this post: Twitter: 7 Decisions You Can Make Before Creating an Account and in that post I explained how you can upload an image for your header and a profile photo (headshot), and edit your theme colour. I carefully cropped screenshots to make it super easy for everyone to follow my instructions (technical writer’s habits die hard I guess) and I patted myself on the back thinking that anyone could now do this without any handholding.

And, then the Twitter gods decided to change it! (grumble, grumble, grumble…)

I’m not sure why the change was put in place, and I’m not convinced that it’s easier, and I’m hoping that these new directions that I’m about to give you will be current for a while at least!

So, here’s an update to the directions in my Twitter post from October:

  1. Select an image for your header.
    The header is the long image that goes across the top of your Twitter account page that other people see.

    This image should be 1500 pixels by 500 pixels and no more than 5 MBs in size. The resolution for your header image can be as low as 72 dpi (dots per inch). The lower the dpi, the smaller the file size.

    Acceptable image file formats include JPG, GIF and PNG. Animated GIFs won’t work as header images.

    Select something that represents you or your brand, or failing that, find something interesting or just plain nice to look at.

    To add or change your header image file:

    1. Log into your Twitter account.
    2. Click on your profile picture, or if you haven’t loaded one yet, the egg photo in the upper left of your Twitter homepage where it shows with the mini version of your header image, Tweets, Following and Follower stats.

      Twitter profile header pic

    3. Below the coloured banner where your header image will appear once you add one, on the right, you’ll see a button labelled Edit profile. Click on that.

      Edit Profile button

    4. Your Twitter profile is then unlocked allowing you to change your header, profile picture and theme colour.
      Profile update screen
    5. Click on the camera icon where it says Change your header photo.

      Change header photo

    6. You are then given the option to Upload photo or Remove. Uploading a new photo will remove the old one.

      Upload or remove option

    7. Click on the blue button on the right labelled Save changes.

      Save changes button

  2. Select a profile photo (headshot).
    Your profile photo is the picture of you that is inset on the header image across the top of your Twitter account page that other people see. It is also the photo that will appear with your tweets.

    This image should be 400 pixels by 400 pixels and remember that the resolution for this image can be as low as 72 dpi (dots per inch) as well.

    Acceptable image file formats include JPG, GIF and PNG. Animated GIFs won’t work here either.

    It’s a good idea to use the same headshot as you’ve used for your avatar as this will increase your recognisability and works as part of your branding.

    1. To add or change your profile picture, follow steps 1 thru 4 above.
    2. Click on the camera icon where it says Change your profile photo.

      Change profile photo

    3. You can then upload a new photo, take a new photo( using your webcam), or remove the existing photo.

      Change profile options

    4. Don’t forget to select the blue button to Save changes.

    The “egg” image is the default but please don’t leave the egg in place. People ignore eggheads when they’re selecting followers because rightly or wrongly it gives the impression that you either you don’t care enough about your Twitter account to upload a picture or you haven’t a clue about what you’re doing with your Twitter account. When you’re first starting out, the latter may be true but you don’t need to advertise it. The old fake it till you make it philosophy comes into play here and remember one step at a time, right?

  3. Determine a theme colour for your Twitter account.
    The instructions given in my earlier post still work but now Twitter allows you to change your theme colour through the Edit profile page.

    1. To change your theme colour through the Edit profile page, follow steps 1 thru 4 above.
    2. Click on where it says Theme colour.
       
      The theme colour is the colour in which the numbers for the stats for your account, i.e. number of tweets, number of followers and following, appears along with anything else that is hyperlinked on your Twitter page, i.e. URLs, hashtags, other Twitter usernames posting or contained within tweets, etc.

      Change theme colour

    3. Make your changes and don’t forget to click on the Save changes button.

I think that about does it — for now!

If you ever notice that my instructions for something on this blog are incorrect or out of date, please let me know.

Photo credit: Freedigital Photos

Canva: Let’s Get Visual!

Canva: Let’s Get Visual! introduces Canva as an easy-to-use graphics design site and why authors should use it for visual content on social media.

As you may recall in my post last week, Twitter: Let’s Get Visual!, I discussed why you should use visual content for Twitter and other social media content and promised to review a few options for producing graphical content. Today, I’d like to tell you about Canva.

Canva is a great site for designing custom graphics that you can use not only on Twitter but on other social media sites, offline reports and presentations, blog posts, and much more.

Easy to Use

Canva is very easy to use. If you can drag, drop and click with your computer mouse, you can design great graphics using Canva.

To Start Using Canva

  1. Sign up for an account or log in with Facebook.
  2. While a confirmation email is sent to your email address, you’ll have the option of watching a 23 second long demo video. Watch it. After all, it’s only 23 seconds long and most of us have an attention span that long still, don’t we?
  3. After the video concludes, you’re given the opportunity to try it out yourself and they provide several exercises to get you started. If you need help, click on the Hint button.

Premium images are watermarked and cost $1. All other images are free to use and there is a great selection.

Canva Design Graphic Options

  • Album / podcast covers 1400 pixels by 1400 pixels
  • Social media 800 pixels x 800 pixels
  • Presentations 1024 pixels x 768 pixels
  • Posters 42 centimetres x 59.4 centimetres
  • Facebook covers 851 pixels by 315 pixels
  • Facebook posts 940 pixels by 780 pixels
  • Blog graphics 800 pixels x 1200 pixels
  • Custom sized graphics in dimensions of your choice in either pixels, millimetres or inches

Canva Design Menu Options

  • Various design elements from the Search menu including:
    • lines
    • banners
    • shapes
    • text holders
    • frames
    • stickers
    • arrows
    • grids
    • speech bubbles
    • and much more
  • Numerous layouts from the Layouts menu
  • A huge assortment of text designs from the Text menu
  • Colours and/or textures from the Background menu

 
You can also upload your own images to use or you can buy from the premium selection of design elements offered by Canva for only $1 each.

Ways to Customize Canva Designs

  • replace the sample text with your own
  • change fonts
  • change font colours
  • change backgrounds
  • change background colours
  • upload your own photos

 
Canva will autosave your design.
 
The mountains are yearningx500

Made with Canva

Sharing Your Canva Designs

  • Share it on Twitter using the button provided at the top of the page
  • Share it on Facebook using the button provided at the top of the page
  • Click on Download or Link and:
    • Link to your design using the link they provide
    • Publish your design as an image
    • Publish your design as a PDF

When you publish your design, it’s downloaded to your machine.

Canva is fun to work with and the results can look very impressive with little skill or effort.

For More Information about Canva

 
Give it a try and let me know what you think!

Photo credit: Apps Mill autumn 2010 | shelleysturgeon.com

Twitter: Let’s Get Visual!

Twitter: Let’s Get Visual! explains the basics of adding visual content, i.e. photos and video, to tweets on Twitter.

Remember that song by Olivia Newton John from the 80’s Physical? I can hear the chorus as I write this (Let’s get physical, physical…) and picture the cheesy outfits, the bouncing buns (check out 14 seconds into the video – link below – if you don’t believe me!), and the sweaty bodies. Perhaps I’m showing my age!

Apologies to those of you who are too young to even know who Olivia Newton John is, but if you want to see what I’m talking about here’s the youtube link.

Back in the day that song was way cool. My sister even wore a headband. Got the pictures to prove it but I think she’d kill me if I showed you!

So, if you know the song, or have just watched the video and it’s still playing in your head, hold that thought, and just for a minute think Twitter and then substitute the words “Let’s get visual!” Yeah I know, pretty lame but bet from this point forward you won’t be able to think of using visual content on Twitter without hearing that song or picturing the video! HA!

Perhaps it is because a picture is worth a thousand words (or so they say!) and Twitter is limited to 140 characters, but using visual content on Twitter is becoming more and more popular. It’s believed that our brains process visual content faster than written words so maybe that accounts for the current popularity of visual content on Twitter?

If you’ve ever watched your Twitter feed in real time, and you’re following a lot of people, that feed will often update faster than you can read it, but a picture or graphic stands out, doesn’t it? Maybe that’s why visual content is so popular on Twitter?

Adding Photos to Your Tweets

Allowed and limitations

  • Image files can be up to 5 MB in size.
  • Acceptable file formats are PNG, JPG and GIF.
  • Animated GIFs can be used but they must not exceed 3 MB in size.

Not allowed

  • Images in file formats BMP and TIFF can’t be used on Twitter.

Photos can include snapshots, screenshots, infographics, memes and, of course, selfies if you’re so inclined.

For more information, log into your Twitter account and click here to learn how to add a photograph to a tweet.

Adding Video to Your Tweets

There are a couple of ways you can add video to your tweets:

  • Including the URL of your video in your tweet
  • Sharing your 6 second videos from your Vine account

For more information about adding video, click here.

For more information about using Vine, click here

Over the next few weeks, I’ll give you more ideas for sharing visual content on Twitter.

Photo courtesy of photostock | Freedigitalphotos.net

Twitter: 7 Decisions You Can Make Before Creating an Account

Twitter: 7 Decisions You Can Make Before Creating an Account by Shelley Sturgeon explains what decisions you can make before you actually open your Twitter account including which photos to use, the criteria for a Twitter username and more.

What’s that expression? Forewarned if forearmed? If you haven’t already created an account, here’s a few decisions you can make ahead of time so that you’re better prepared and not left in a panic when you’re bombarded with questions when you set up a Twitter account for the first time.

  1. Decide on your Twitter username.
    When you create a Twitter account, Twitter will suggest some possible Twitter usernames for you to use, but you are also welcome to come up with your own.

    Your Twitter username, a.k.a. Twitter handle, is comprised of up to 15 characters excluding the “@” symbol which will prefix it. Twitter usernames are unique, in the same way and for the same reasons that email addresses and phone numbers are unique.

    You can change your Twitter username at any time by logging into Twitter and going to your account settings. Carefully consider whether you want to / need to change your Twitter username because this could confuse your followers.

    When you create a Twitter username, you will most likely want to associate this with your name or the name of your business. So, for example, my Twitter username is @ShelleySturgeon and, just to confuse you, I’ve associated my Twitter username with *drum roll please* TAH DA — Shelley Sturgeon!

  2. Select an image for your header.
    The header is the long image that goes across the top of your Twitter account page that other people see.

    This image should be 1500 pixels by 500 pixels and no more than 5 MBs in size. The resolution for your header image can be as low as 72 dpi (dots per inch). The lower the dpi, the smaller the file size.

    Acceptable image file formats include JPG, GIF and PNG. Animated GIFs won’t work as header images.

    Select something that represents you or your brand, or failing that, find something interesting or just plain nice to look at.

    To add or change your header image file:

    1. Log into your Twitter account.
    2. Click on your profile picture, or if you haven’t loaded one yet, the egg photo in the upper right corner of your Twitter page.

      Finding Settings

    3. Click on Settings.
    4. Continue reading “Twitter: 7 Decisions You Can Make Before Creating an Account”